Worcestershire and the Malvern Hills Tour

WORCESTERSHIRE AND MALVERN HILLS WAS THE BIRTHPLACE AND HOME OF COMPOSER SIR EDWARD ELGAR. VISIT WORCESTER CATHEDRAL, ELGAR’S BIRTHPLACE, THE MUSEUM OF ROYAL WORCESTER, OR LEARN ABOUT THE ENGLISH CIVIL WAR AT THE COMMANDERY.

‘How is Worcestershire? Is it still the same between us?’ is a line from Clifford T Ward’s song ‘Home Thoughts from Abroad’ which in a BBC poll in 2002 was voted Britain’s fourth favourite song.

Inspired by Robert Browning’s poem of the same name, both reflecting on thoughts of England from abroad. Worcestershire (pronounced Woostersher) could be described as quintessential England. The county is the birthplace of composer Sir Edward Elgar. Worcestershire Sauce is famous around the world, and still manufactured in Worcester. Worcester is also famous for Royal Worcester Porcelain, sadly no longer produced in the city, however, you can visit the fine museum containing Worcester porcelain.

The tomb of King John, of Magna Carta fame, can be seen in Worcester Cathedral. The Battle of Worcester, the last battle in the English Civil took place in Worcester. The future King Charles II narrowly escaping with his life. The Commandery, the Royalist HQ can be visited. The east of the county is bordered by the Cotswolds and the village of Broadway.

The Malvern Hills, a 9 miles long ridge of hills rising to 425m (1394ft) form the western boundary of the county. Malvern became popular in the 19th century for the ‘Water Cure’ and was visited by people such as Charles Dickens, Charles Darwin, and American writer Henry James. It was in Malvern during WWII that the ‘boffins’ developed RADAR. The town is also the home of the Morgan Car Company, this iconic car is still manufactured and it is possible to book a factory tour.

Sir Edward Elgar lived for many years in Malvern and his walks on the Malvern Hills would inspire his music. His grave can be visited at Little Malvern. Authors JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis also regularly walked on the Malvern Hills. The town’s gas lamps may have inspired CS Lewis’ ‘The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe’. The town still has around 100 gas street lamps.

Also to be found in Worcestershire is Croome Park, ‘Capability’ Brown’s first landscaping commission, and Witley Court and Garden, a dramatic ruin as a result of a fire in the 1930s, it was once visited by Bob Dylan when ghost hunting in the 1960s.

Book a private tour with a Blue Badge Guide and explore this beautiful county. A tour can combine a visit to Hereford and Herefordshire.

Admission tickets are also needed for some attractions.

 

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If you require a guide with a private car to conduct your tour please tick above. This will send your request to one of our driver guides who are UK licensed, registered and insured.

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